When I woke up from my afternoon nap, the electricity was cut off – just as usual – the air in the room was hot and sticky, the sun blazing through the curtains, I sat straight, my head was still spinning, eyes blurry, I couldn’t get hold of my glasses on the night stand. I […]
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Unplugged

When I woke up from my afternoon nap, the electricity was cut off – just as usual – the air in the room was hot and sticky, the sun blazing through the curtains, I sat straight, my head was still spinning, eyes blurry, I couldn’t get hold of my glasses on the night stand. I fell back to bed, my stomach still hurting, in knots, feeling acid in my throat. This was too much to handle, I took out my phone, and suddenly I learned that it was fried, done, dead. Perfect.

I stood up, got to my souvenirs box, and took out my dearest belonging, my old blackberry, though I couldn’t turn on the internet service, my phone was left with no means to communicate but texts and phone calls, and I got to take a glimpse of the good old days, before social media took over, before everything had gone haywire. I remembered the days when everything was simpler, when I didn’t have to spend a reasonable amount of my day checking my tweets or likes, replying to people, or letting everyone in the world join me for lunch. I missed the days when a missed call used to mean “I’m thinking about you”, when two missed calls meant I’m in for the night out; when it was such an amazing thrill to wake up to that morning text, to fall asleep after fighting over who’s gonna hang up first, when life didn’t consist of “last seens” and “check ins”. I recalled the bliss of the good old vintage social media, when we used to sign our year books, write on each others textbooks, go on with conversations on secretly slipped notes in class.

Being in the out gave me the extreme pleasure of solitude, of calmness and serenity. I spent the rest of the day, tucked in bed, book in hand, and a herbal tea in the other, the aroma filling the room up to my nostrils, blissful and in awe. I wasn’t at the party everyone was invited to, I was at a party of one, and I found out that I enjoyed my company immensely, there was no longer a gaping hole in my body, my soul was complete.

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